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Great article from the fine folks at Lifehacker.  I know when I was looking for my desk I spent a lot of time researching the type of wood, construction, style, and finish I wanted.  I planned to have my desk for decades and hand down to my son so the perfect culmination of all those aspects was most important.  

Today marks 1 year for MinimalDesks

Today marks the 1 year anniversary that MinimalDesks became hatched out on Tumblr.  To date we have 683 inspirational desk/workspace postings with thousands of followers and scores of daily visitors to the site directly.  I am proud that during this time the site has not missed one single day of postings for your enjoyment.  This includes weekends, holidays and vacations.  This has been a true labor of love for me and I remain as engaged today as I was starting out a year ago.  

We’ve had many posts featured on Life Hacker, Macworld Sweden and we recently made Herman Miller’s Top 10 Destinations of the week.  MinimalDesks will soon be featured in the Design category under the Tumblr Spotlight.  It feels wonderful getting recognized as a resource and adding value to the community at large.

Thanks so much to our wonderful readers for following along this past year and sharing us with your own followers constantly.  I look to many great things in the year ahead.

"What Successful People Do With The First Hour Of Their Work Day"

Interesting article recently published on Fast Company entitled “What Successful People Do With The First Hour Of Their Work Day

Small spoiler: “Don’t check e-mail for the first hour”

I’ve always struggled with this concept and tend to do the opposite first thing when I sit down at my desk in the morning.  My entire business life is online.  I hardly do phone or face to face anything so for me my e-mail client tends to be a bag of bricks sitting on my chest first thing in the morning.  I try to spend my first hour addressing e-mail and clearing my plate so that I can move forward with a clear mind and tackle the most important tasks of the day.   I like to examine and consider all advice or ideas, like those in the article, but by the same token I’m a firm believer that everyone should experiment and create their own hybrid system for approaching their work day.

Happy Father’s day, Bob. :-)
Since our theme revolves around workspaces and by extension, minimalism in our approach to said workspaces, I would like to take this moment and honor my Father-in-law, Bob, on this Father’s Day.  I snapped this photograph circa 2001 at his desk in New Jersey.  Although Bob clearly does not share our philosophy, he has MANY redeeming qualities and a great man.
*My wife gets the credit for this post suggestion.  She thought it would be quite  humorous given the contents of the picture, and the holiday.

Happy Father’s day, Bob. :-)

Since our theme revolves around workspaces and by extension, minimalism in our approach to said workspaces, I would like to take this moment and honor my Father-in-law, Bob, on this Father’s Day.  I snapped this photograph circa 2001 at his desk in New Jersey.  Although Bob clearly does not share our philosophy, he has MANY redeeming qualities and a great man.

*My wife gets the credit for this post suggestion.  She thought it would be quite  humorous given the contents of the picture, and the holiday.

Here’s my desk, finally.
Back in April I revealed that in spite of running a site based around desks and workspaces, I did not own one of my own since relocating domiciles for work two and a half years ago.  After working on my Macbook Pro from the kitchen table or the sofa I embarked on what I deemed a “desk-quest.”  I did not to set out to buy any desk, but a desk that I viewed as an heirloom piece that I could pass down to my son 50-plus years from now.   I researched all of the components and methodologies that go into crafting quality, lasting furniture.  I examined types of wood.  I studied construction.  I scrutinized finishes and I looked at hardware.  After a culmination of many late nights and early mornings I arrived at what I feel is a match made in heaven.
I’ve used this desk for the past 30 days and I notice something quite interesting.  My computer infrequently touches this desk and primarily resides in my briefcase when home, with some exceptions of course.  Most often I update MinimalDesks right from my iPad and sofa. My desk time is largely spent reading out of paper books or writing in my paper Moleskine journal.  I spend 9 hours daily on my computer in the office, so essentially, this home oriented workspace emerged as my digital-less sanctuary.  My way of re-connecting to paper and ink and abandoning the 1’s and 0’s, even if for only for a few hours.  Talk about liberating.
**Since I know some may wonder. My workspace is setup in the den at the back of the house.  So, that’s not actually the front door you see in the picture.

Here’s my desk, finally.

Back in April I revealed that in spite of running a site based around desks and workspaces, I did not own one of my own since relocating domiciles for work two and a half years ago.  After working on my Macbook Pro from the kitchen table or the sofa I embarked on what I deemed a “desk-quest.”  I did not to set out to buy any desk, but a desk that I viewed as an heirloom piece that I could pass down to my son 50-plus years from now.   I researched all of the components and methodologies that go into crafting quality, lasting furniture.  I examined types of wood.  I studied construction.  I scrutinized finishes and I looked at hardware.  After a culmination of many late nights and early mornings I arrived at what I feel is a match made in heaven.

I’ve used this desk for the past 30 days and I notice something quite interesting.  My computer infrequently touches this desk and primarily resides in my briefcase when home, with some exceptions of course.  Most often I update MinimalDesks right from my iPad and sofa. My desk time is largely spent reading out of paper books or writing in my paper Moleskine journal.  I spend 9 hours daily on my computer in the office, so essentially, this home oriented workspace emerged as my digital-less sanctuary.  My way of re-connecting to paper and ink and abandoning the 1’s and 0’s, even if for only for a few hours.  Talk about liberating.

**Since I know some may wonder. My workspace is setup in the den at the back of the house.  So, that’s not actually the front door you see in the picture.

Most of us view our workspace in terms of merely a desk in the middle of a room, much like an island situated amid the sea. There’s actually a host of characteristics comprising effective, inspiring workspace. What type of lighting is in the room. Paint color. Type of flooring. And so on. Some of it we can tailor, while other aspects we unfortunately cannot.  I came across this article in Psychology Today that delves into the nuances surrounding ceiling height and how it can affect your work. Quite interesting.

We’re more creative in spaces with higher ceilings. All else being equal, people are more innovative in places with 10 foot ceilings than they are when the ceiling hovers 8 feet above the floor.

When the ceiling in a room we’re in is lower than about 9 feet, we start to feel crowded and want other people (except those we’re on really good terms with) to stay farther away from us. If we feel crowded or cramped we get stressed and distracted from whatever we’re trying to accomplish.


Click here for the full Psychology Today article.